Thursday, April 13, 2017

RIP J. Geils : 1946 - 2017



A couple of days ago, I heard on the news that J. Geils passed away on April 11th at the age of 71. Few groups take me back the way the J. Geils Band does. I regret now that I never got to see them perform live. I loved the song Centerfold from the moment I first heard it at the Granbury skating rink sometime around 1981 or 1982. My parents bought it for me on 45, and I wore it slap out on our living room console stereo. Great times.

Although we didn't have MTV in the early 80s, the videos for Freeze Frame and Centerfold were popular on the Video Music Break and Video Jukebox type music promo "commercials" that came on between cable movies. The only time I got to see that sort of thing was when I was visiting my grandparents in Ruston. They were the ones with cable tv. Mom, Dad, and I lived out in the sticks where cable wasn't available at the time, so it was a special treat whenever I got to see the videos of my favorite bands. It was total brain candy.

Centerfold used to play in heavy rotation along with songs like Mary Buffett's My Boyfriend's Back, Bob Welch's Ebony Eyes, Mickey by Toni Basil, and You Might Think by the Cars. While I was too young to fully understand the risque lyrics of Centerfold, I loved it, and I loved the video too. Hip band guys, pretty dancing girls, and then there was J. Geils himself - the epitome of new wave cool with his feathered hair, razor-sharp cheekbones, and red striped shirt under a tough-glam rhinestone jacket. I was hooked.

Listening to that song now, it still jams. The video, too, is just as fun as it ever was. If you ask me, the intro to Centerfold is probably one of the top ten catchiest and most memorable song intros ever recorded. I'm terribly sad that J. Geils is gone. Nevertheless, it's safe to say he has left behind an indelible musical legacy, one made ever more influential and enduring due to one unforgettable song. #RIP

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

DNA Testing: 23 & Me Follow Up

My 23&Me test results are in!  They've been in a couple of days now, but I've only posted about it on FB up to this point. I wanted to share it with a couple of relatives I'm connected with there who were curious to see what my results would be.

I didn't screen grab the biggest read out with the genes all color coded. It's TMI, but not only that, the read out is waaay too big for my laptop screen. I have to zoom out to see the whole thing, and at that size, a screen grab makes it unreadable. That's okay, though. I actually prefer the ancestry timeline that shows when the relatives you inherited genes from where alive, and in roughly what generation. That makes it easier for comparing with my family tree on the FamilySearch.org site.

Out of my ancestry composition, I'm mostly British and Irish. That was my largest "slice" of any grouping, and not surprising. Mom's paternal side of the family is Irish and Scottish. The second largest percentage was French and German. The French is from Mom's side, the German from Dad.

I expected to see waaaay more German in the mix since we can trace Dad's side of the family back to the original village the family line originated from. But it was only around 14%, combined with the French markers.


Next in the mix was Scandinavian. That was kind of surprising but not really. I'm guessing this comes from Dad's side of the family. Unless, this somehow counted toward Mom's Scottish roots. My Scottish great grandmother was a Murdock, and allegedly there are Viking origins to that name? I'm totally guessing, so take that with a grain of salt. At any rate, I'll find out whether it's from Mom or Dad soon enough, since they're both getting kits for their birthdays. Dad's kit is already on the way.

Eastern European showed up in my results after Scandinavian. That undoubtedly is from Grandma on Dad's side. Half of her line was from Czechoslovakia. (Which is now, separately Slovakia and Czech Republic.) I believe there was some Irish and Hungarian mixed in there as well.

Next on the chart was South Asian, which is definitely from Mom's side of the family, although I haven't found anyone in my family tree who was specificially South Asian. The markers shows up in even stronger percentages in some of the GEDMatch databases, and breaks it down even further as something like 20% Caucasus Region/Baloch/Gedrosia/Near East/India.

I think I know which ancestor the South Asian refers to, but she was allegedy Native American. She had several sons, which are mom's grandpa and great uncles, etc. The family lived on and beside the Kaskaskia reservation in Jackson County Illinois, and after the land was taken away, they moved to Missouri and lived on and around the Peoria reservation. When that land was taken away, the family branched off. Some relatives went to the Peoria reservation in Oklahoma, where it is today. Others moved to Texas. It's all fairly well documented.

23&Me didn't pick up any American Indian results or traces, but I don't know if that's because they have smaller reference groups of that type to work from, or what. Using my raw genetic data downloaded from the site, I uploaded it to GEDMatch and got positive hits from two of the World databases. In one of the oracles, the admixture was 6% AmerIndian and the other was 2% AmerIndian, and that's separate from the Caucasus/Gedrosia which triggered the South Asian results at 23&Me. All that said, having 2-6% AmerIndian makes sense if framed in a birth/living timeline estimated between 1710 to 1830 for my ancestor.


Lastly, I'm not sure what the aqua colored wedge from the World9 is. It's listed as "Southern". Maybe Southern European? In my 23 & Me results, I had a very tiny mix of "Broadly Southern European" that doesn't even show up on the Ancestry Timeline. However, if that's what Southern is in the GEDMatch stands for, that particular database pulled a much larger segment of Southern European from my raw data. Maybe they just had a larger resource population to reference from?  I'm not sure.

Moving on to other elements from the DNA results, I ended up with 54% fewer Neanderthal ancestry than most 23&Me testers. That's how it served up the information, as compared to others who have been tested. Anyway, apparently, this neanderthal DNA is where my height comes from (I'm 5'ft / 5'ft1" thereabouts), and it is the reason why I don't have a hairy back. (In case you ever wanted to know, lol.)

One of the GEDMatch databases has a fun eye color predictor (based on genetic information from my raw data). It returned that my eyes are a mix of brown+amber+gray with a gray limbal ring, and starburst pattern around the pupil. It even gave me a little picture of the prediction...which I can't seem to find at the moment. But it was fairly correct, minus a few small details.

I will give it this...the results were especially true of my eyes when I was younger. They looked very much like the site reference image when I was in Kindergarten, but now, in my 40's, I'm losing some brown pigment. My eyes are more of a dark honey color now, and I have several dark freckles on the iris, many yellowy nerve rings, and faintly greenish color pockets when looking extremely up close in good lighting. The pigment loss is almost certainly genetic. My mother, and her mother's, eyes went through the same change late in life. I can pretty much look at Mom's eyes and tell what mine will look like 10 to 20 years or so down the road as the pigment loss progresses.


That's a macro of Mom's eye I took last year. That's her natural gray limbal ring - no circle lenses worn. I have it, too, but my limbal rings are thinner, possibly due to the fact my eyes are still relatively dark where hers have lightened considerably. Her irises are no longer dark brown like they used to be. They're more of a hazel/amber now with green rings.

For now that's all the DNA results I've managed to pull together. Dad's kit is on the way, and I'll be picking one up for Mom in a month or so. I still need to pull together some funds to order it. I can hardly wait to link up all our kits. 23&Me will allegedly be able to tell me what genes I pulled from what parent. Also, we'll get to see what Dad's haplogroup is. Since I'm female, I can only test for my maternal haplogroup.,.which, as it turns out, is T1a1.

I've researched T1a1 since the tests came back, but there's little written about it outside of  handful of sites. The info from one of the larger sites seems to be duplicated in other places. Apparently, it's not as common a haplogroup, so it's not written about as often. Maybe that will change as more people have their kits done and the reference pool grows.

Anyway...fun times!  I thoroughly enjoyed reading through the results. The test was totally worth it. The wait time for results, which for me was from the first week of February to the last week of March, was a real doozy though. There's a time marker on the 23&Me website that lets you check up on where you are in the testing process, but even as it was moving along, mine never went through all the plot points on the time graphic. That could be why it seemed like such a long wait. Then again, maybe it was just me and my eternal impatience. I've never been a very good sport when it comes to waiting. Maybe that's a genetic thing. ☺